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The “Bomb Threat” Protocol

Nicolas Coloma-Cook, Contributor

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On the loudspeaker this past week, the BC High community heard an announcement along the lines of “Dear BC High, we are currently dealing with a bomb threat. The police have been notified. Teachers, please hold all students from going to second lunch and all students should leave the cafeteria area.” Many observers would think this message would be extremely unusual, but unfortunately it is quite the opposite for the student body within BC High. I have been attending this school since 7th grade and as a current junior, I have lost track of how many bomb threats we have had in my time here. In fact, there has been more bomb threats that could potentially put the students and faculty in grave danger then there have been practice fire drills in my experience at BC High. I am not blaming BC High for this alarming frequency because that is obviously out of their control, but the aspect that makes me most anxious is how each of these threats have been handled.
Undoubtedly any type of incident like a bomb threat is very serious, but due to the frequency of these incidents, the gravity of each seems to be watered down. “When the announcement came on the speaker that there was a bomb threat, it was essentially disregarded and the teacher I had during that period just continued teaching like nothing had happened”, says junior Ian Mclaughlin, “…and by the end of the day I had forgotten we even had a bomb threat.” The administration is not making these incidents seem like “no big deal”, but instead the reactions to these incidents are. This is why instead of just continuing with our day as a school, there should be more action taken do signify that each of these threats are in fact a grave matter. The BC High administration has various options they could implement, from having the teacher just acknowledge these threats to creating a new protocol that would be similar to “lockdown mode.”
The student body also is not certain on what to do if, God forbid, a bomb threat would put our school in serious danger. If we had to evacuate the premises in a neat, efficient way, unless that process is the same as a fire drill, the students have not practiced this. It would have been logical to implement this years ago considering these bomb threats have been the main threat to the safety of the BC High community over the past few years. All in all, improving the protocol for bomb threats and publicizing this should be at the forefront of the administrations tasks, and with these changes the sentiments students have about these incidents will go from “just another bomb threat” to a much more severe situation.

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The “Bomb Threat” Protocol